Tag Archives: Google analytics

Tracking Your Paid Advertising (PPC)

It’s one thing to spend lots of money on paid advertising on either Google or Facebook, it’s another thing to know if these things are working or not.

Tracking is extremely important, here’s an example.

A client wanted to run an advert campaign on Facebook and Google but didn’t know which one would be more successful, they wanted to run campaigns for dental implants and orthodontics.

We set up both Google and Facebook ad campaign and directed visitors to the relevant pages on the client’s website.

Running paid advertising (PPC) in itself is just ‘presence optimisation‘, in other words getting more people to the website. What’s also important is ‘conversion optimisation’, in other words getting more people to convert… And it is this that we monitored.

The campaign monitoring is set up in two halves:

  1. The advert itself on either Facebook or Google Adwords pushes campaign data into Google analytics by using Source, Medium and Campaign tracking.
  2. Google analytics has goals set up which are triggered via these campaigns.

On the client’s website they had 3 conversion mechanisms that we were tracking:

  1. A request an appointment form, we know that a new patient appointment is £55 so we can allocate this amount each time the form is triggered.
  2. A discounted dental health check available online only, we know that this appointment is worth £25 so we can allocate this amount each time this form is triggered.
  3. A free consultation, we know that patients that book for these tend to go ahead so we allocated an arbitrary £200 each time this form was triggered.

Each time the form is filled in it bounces the user off to a ‘thank you’ page, this thank you page is then set up in Google analytics as a goal with the necessary amount allocated against it.

Because the adverts are sending through data such as ‘Facebook’ or ‘Adwords’ and ‘Implants’ or ‘Ortho’ This can then be pulled out as a Google analytics report and we can see visitor data for each of these.

Facebook versus Google PPC

 

Because Google analytics can then multiply the number of times the goal was triggered for each campaign and source we can then extrapolate the value of each and compare this to how much we have paid.

Here’s what we found for the past 30 days:

Campaign results of Facebook and Google PPC

The question now is, what would you do with these results?

Here’s a summary of how the process work.

added tracking codes to adwords cmapigns--utm_source=Adwords&utm_medium=PPC&utm_campaign=Implants-utm_source=Adwords&utm_medium=PPC&utm_campaign=Ortho (1)

What type of person is looking at your website – and how can you use this data to improve your marketing?

Wouldn’t it be good if you knew the type of person that was looking at your website? If you knew that they were interested in films, technology, celebrities or shopping it would enable you to focus your marketing around these areas wouldn’t it?

Think about it, if someone is interested in films they’re more likely to watch videos, someone more interested in technology is more likely to want to know about the techno gadgets you have in the practice and someone interested in celebrities may be more interested to read a blog post that you write which looks at various celebrities and the dental treatment they have had.

You may have been told that a key demographic in dentistry is the 35-year-old female, but is this correct? Is this actually right for your website and your business, if only you could know exactly who those people were that were looking at your website it would enable you to be more accurate in all of your marketing, perhaps people visiting your website are 50-year-old men?.

Information and data is key to informing your marketing and making the right decisions, everyone knows that, and now it’s possible… Here’s how.

Google audiencesGoogle Audiences & Interests

If you look in your Google analytics account (you do have access to this don’t you!) You will be able to see a section which says “Audiences”.

If you click on this, and you have this function setup, you will begin to see the analytics for the Age, gender and interests of your website visitors.

If you don’t already have the setup you will need to modify the analytics code within your website. If you have access to your website itself it’s actually pretty simple, if you don’t then here are some instructions to send to your web designer.

Dear <<Web designer>>,

I would like to begin using Google’s new audience and interest facility in my Google analytics but I need you to modify the analytics code in my website, As follows.

If we are using Google’s universal analytics please can you insert the text in bold in between the ‘create’ and ‘send’ commands in my analytics code.

ga('create', 'UA-XXXXXX-XX', 'example.com');
ga(‘require’, ‘displayfeatures’);
ga('send', 'pageview');

Here is a support document which should help you if you need it https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/2444872?hl=en&utm_id=ad

Once you have modified the code you will then begin to see data in this section, here’s some interesting data that I have collected for one of my dental practice websites.

Gender of website visitors

This kind of challenges the notion that your target audience might be female doesn’t it? Certainly this dental practice has 71.6% of its visitors which are male… Extremely useful information to know when designing and creating additional marketing.

Here is more information that we have gleaned from the same website:

Interest categories

  • Movie lovers 1091 visits.
  • Technophiles 1052 visits.
  • News junkies and avid readers/entertainment and celebrity news junkies 949 visits.
  • Shoppers/shopaholics 936 visits.

(Visitors can exist in more than one category at a time)

So we know that the top visitors to this website are movie lovers and technophiles. I wonder how interested these people would be in watching videos on the website?

I also wonder how interested these people would be in knowing which gadgets the practice are using, perhaps digital dentistry, CEREC, digital imaging, digital x-rays etc. If these other people visiting your website shouldn’t you be mentioning these services as a priority?

Having information like this to hand not only lets your designers know how your website could be designed from an aesthetic point of view, but it lets you know the kind of content you might want to have and indeed can inform your wider marketing decisions about who your target audience is.

How does Google gather this data?

Here is what they say:

When someone visits a website that has partnered with the Google Display Network, Google stores a number in their browsers (using a “cookie”) to remember their visits. This number uniquely identifies a web browser on a specific computer, not a specific person. Browsers may be associated with a demographic category, such as gender or age range, based on the sites that were visited.

In addition, some sites might provide us with demographic information that people share on certain websites, such as social networking sites. We may also use demographics derived from Google profiles.

Have you set up this kind of analytics for your website yet? If you have let me know, and if you are happy, share your experiences of the information you have found…

Happy data mining 🙂